Gallery 224

Artists in Residence | Featured Artist | Studio Gallery | Workshops | Programs

 

Friday, December 15, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
Alexander Calder

"Alexander Calder"
A co-production of American Masters and Florentine Films/Sherman Pictures, Alexander Calder is the definitive portrait of the inventor of the mobile. This acclaimed film shows Calder at work in his studio, and features never-before-seen archival films and photographs. It includes contemporary shooting of dozens of works, seen as Calder meant them to be viewed, in dynamic motion. Interviewees include: Arthur Miller, Ellsworth Kelly, I.M. Pei, Brendan Gill, Marla Prather, David Ross, Calder's daughters and grandson, Sandy Rower, and others.

The film received rave reviews, including Pick-of-the-Week status in People and an "A" in Entertainment Weekly. Sherman made an appearance on Charlie Rose, during which Rose called the film "an extraordinary American masterpiece." Legendary agent Robby Lantz said it was "a masterful movie portrait," and Susan Lacy, executive producer of American Masters, described it simply as "the best artist portrait I've ever seen."

Director: Roger M. Sherman
Duration: 60 minutes
Click for a Trailer

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Friday, November 17, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
John James Audubon: Drawn from Nature

"John James Audubon: Drawn from Nature"
John James Audubon is best known for The Birds of America, a book of 435 images, portraits of every bird then known in the United States – painted and reproduced in the size of life. Its creation cost Audubon eighteen years of monumental effort in finding the birds, making the book, and selling it to subscribers. Audubon also wrote thousands of pages about birds (Ornithological Biography); he’d completed half of a collection of paintings of mammals (The Viviparous Quadrapeds of North America) when his eyesight failed in 1846.

Director: Lawrence Hott
Duration: 60 minutes

 

 

Friday, October 20, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
An Art that Nature Makes

"An Art that Nature Makes" (The Work of Rosamond Purcell)
Finding unexpected beauty in the discarded and decayed, photographer Rosamond Purcell has developed a body of work that has garnered international acclaim, graced the pages of National Geographic and over 20 published books, and has attracted admirers such as Jonathan Safran Foer, Errol Morris and Stephen Jay Gould. An Art That Nature Makes details Purcell's fascination with the natural world from a mastodon tooth to a hydrocephalic skull offering insight into her unique way of re-contextualizing objects both ordinary and strange into sometimes disturbing but always breathtaking imagery.

Director: Molly Bernstein
Duration: 74 minutes
Click for a trailer

 

 

Friday, August 18, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
Art Bastard

Art Bastard
Money may rule the contemporary art market, but over the course of his prolific career, Robert Cenedella has challenged the system with his funny and fantastical paintings of life in New York City. Art Bastard is both an alternate history of modern art and a provocative portrait of a self-styled rebel who believes that "You can bastardize everything else in your life, but if you compromise your art, why be an artist?"

Director: Victor Kanefsky
Duration: 82 minutes
Click for a trailer

 

 

 

Friday, July 21, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
Mr. Dial Has Something to Say

Mr. Dial Has Something to Say
Mr. Dial Has Something to Say asks the following questions: What is the meaning and history of this movement? Who are the artists and why do they create? Has Afro-American improvisational visual art been disregarded by the mainstream art world as less important? Have terms such as “outsider”, “visionary,” “primitive,” “folk,” “self-taught,” and “naïve” — all of which have been applied to this particular style — downgraded the importance of this art?

Thornton Dial (10 September 1928 – 25 January 2016) was a pioneering African-American artist who came to prominence in the late 1980s. Dial’s body of work exhibits formal variety through expressive, densely composed assemblages of found materials, often executed on a monumental scale.

Director: Celia Carey 
Duration: 60 minutes
No trailer is available.

Friday, June 23, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan

Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan
The remarkable career of the movie industry's most admired and influential special-effects auteur, the legendary Ray Harryhausen, is the subject of Gilles Penso's definitive documentary Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan.

Leaving no doubt as to Harryhausen's seminal influence on modern-day special effects, the documentary features enlightening and entertaining interviews with the man himself by Randy Cook, Peter Jackson, Nick Park, Phil Tippet, Terry Gilliam, Dennis Muren, John Landis, Guillermo del Toro, James Cameron, Steven Spielberg and many more. These filmmakers, who today push the boundaries of special effects movie-making, pay tribute to the father of Stop Motion animation and films such as The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, It Came from Beneath the Sea, The 7th Voyage of Sinbad, Mysterious Island, Jason and the Argonauts and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad – the films that enthralled them as children and inspired them to become filmmakers in their own right.

Director: Gilles Penso 
Duration: 97 minutes
Click to see a trailer

Friday, May 19, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
A Great Day in Harlem

A Great Day in Harlem or Harlem 1958 is a 1958 black and white group portrait of 57 jazz musicians photographed on a street in Harlem, New York City. Art Kane, a freelance photographer working for Esquire magazine, took the picture around 10 a.m. in the summer of 1958. The musicians had gathered on 126th Street, between Fifth and Madison Avenues in Harlem. Jean Bach, a radio producer of New York, recounted the story behind it in her 1994 documentary film, A Great Day in Harlem. The film was nominated in 1995 for an Academy Award for Documentary Feature.

Click here for a trailer

 

 

Friday, April 28, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
STRAND, Under the Dark Cloth

STRAND, Under the Dark Cloth
This documentary studies the life and artwork of photographer Paul Strand, using
his own compelling photography as well as interviews with his friends, acquaintances
and third wife. Documentarian John Walker explores the various inuences Strand encountered throughout his life that helped him to develop as an artist. His personal life and relationships are examined and shed light on the inner working of this man who achieved great renown while hiding "under the dark cloth".

Photo above: The Family, Luzzara, Italy, 1953, by Paul Strand

Directed by: John Walker
Duration: 81 minutes

 

 

Friday, March 17, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
Men at Lunch: The Untold Story of a City's Legend

Men at Lunch: The Untold Story of a City's Legend
In Men at Lunch, director Seán Ó Cualáin tells the story of "Lunch atop a Skyscraper," the iconic photograph taken during the construction of Rockefeller Center that depicts eleven workmen taking their lunch break while casually perched along a steel girder boots dangling 850 feet above the sidewalk, Central Park and the misty Manhattan skyline stretching out behind them.

Part homage, part investigation, Men at Lunch is the sublime tale of an American icon, an unprecedented race to the sky and the immigrant workers that built New York.

For 80 years, the identity of the eleven men and the photographer that immortalized them remained a mystery: their stories, lost in time, subsumed by the fame of the image itself. But then, at the start of the 21st century, the photograph finally began to give up some of its secrets.

Directed by: Seán Ó Cualáin
Duration: 67 minutes
Click for a trailer

Friday, February 17, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
PACKED IN A TRUNK: The Lost Art of Edith Lake Wilkinson

PACKED IN A TRUNK: The Lost Art of Edith Lake Wilkinson
PACKED IN A TRUNK celebrates the long-buried talent of artist Edith Lake Wilkinson who was part of the early Provincetown art scene and produced an astounding body of work. In 1924 she was committed to an asylum, encouraged by the family lawyer who subsequently siphoned off her funds. Edith's great-niece, Jane Anderson (Emmy Award-winning writer & director) grew up surrounded by Edith's paintings, thanks to her mother who had gone poking through that dusty attic and rescued Edith's work. Anderson learned to paint and draw under the influence of her great-aunt's brilliant, light-drenched canvasses. When she started pursuing her own life as an artist, Jane began a decades-long journey to get Edith's work back out into the world.

Directed by: Michelle Boyaner
Duration: 78 minutes
Click for Edith's website
Click for a trailer

 

Friday, January 20, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
The Cats of Mirikitani

The Cats of Mirikitani
Eighty-year-old Jimmy Mirikitani survived the trauma of WWII internment camps, Hiroshima and homelessness by creating art. But when 9/11 threatens his life on the New York City streets and a local filmmaker brings him to her home, the two embark on a journey to confront Jimmy's painful past. An intimate exploration of the lingering wounds of war and the healing power of community and art.

Directed by: Linda Hattendorf
Duration: 74 minutes
Click for the website
Click for a trailer

 

 

Wednesday, December 21, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
Half Past Autumn: The Life & Works of Gordon Parks

Half Past Autumn: The Life and Works of Gordon Parks
A true twentieth century Renaissance man, Gordon Parks is one of the most prolific and diverse artists in America today. A preeminent photographer, poet, novelist, composer and filmmaker, Parks's artistic vision knows no boundaries. This candid portrait of the artist is a journey throught the watershed moments on America's social history, punctuated by Parks' seminal works and his unique ability to follow his instincts to the most fascinating and challenging places in the world.

Directed by: Craig Rice
Duration: 91 minutes

 

 

 

Wednesday, November 16, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
Bill Cunningham NEW YORK

Bill Cunningham NEW YORK
Richard Press's flattering, but never fawning portrait of New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham distinguishes itself from most other art and fashion documentaries. First of all, Cunningham doesn't produce work that ends up on gallery walls. Instead, his candid snapshots of the city's most fashionable citizens have graced the paper's Style section for decades. That accessibility, however, doesn't make the octogenarian any less of an artist.

Navigating New York with his humble Schwinn, clad in his blue canvas jacket, Cunningham doesn't miss a trick or a trend. In an era when anyone can take a digital photo and upload it to the Internet, he still shoots on film, and style mavens pour through his columns, "On the Street" and "Evening Hours," to see what's hip and whether or not they made the cut. For all his talent, though, Cunningham, a devout Catholic, eschews free drinks and other perks, and has lived in the same humble Carnegie Hall studio for 50 years. Press injects some suspense into the scenario when circumstances force Cunningham out of this rent-controlled paradise. Fortunately, a solution will be forthcoming. Along the way, Bonfire of the Vanities author Tom Wolfe, Vogue editor Anna Wintour (star of the equally fine September Issue), and other observers offer their thoughts, though Press always returns to Cunningham, whose joie de vivre will surely prove irresistible even to those who normally couldn't care less about cameras and clothes. --Kathleen C. Fennessy

Duration: 84 minutes
Directed by: Richard Press
To view a trailer, CLICK HERE

Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
IN NO GREAT HURRY: 13 Lessons in Life with Saul Leiter

In No Great Hurry
13 Lessons in Life with Saul Leiter
In No Great Hurry is a fascinating documentary on one of the 20th century's most beloved street photographers, Saul Leiter (1923-2013). Leiter, a contemporary of Diane Arbus and Richard Avedon, could have been celebrated as the great pioneer of color photography long ago (his fashion work was published in Harper's Bazaar and Esquire), but he was never driven by the lure of conventional success. Instead he preferred to drink coffee and photograph in his own way, amassing an archive of gorgeous work piled high in his New York City apartment. Intimate and beautifully rendered, In No Great Hurry follows Saul as he deals with the triple burden of clearing a houseful of memories, becoming world-famous in his eighties, and fending off a pesky filmmaker.

Directed by: Tomas Leach
Duration: 75 minutes
Click for a Trailer

Wednesday, September 21, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
The Visual Language of Herbert Matter

The Visual Language of Herbert Matter
Herbert Matter was a man who seemingly fit many lives into one by excelling in the creative disciplines of design, photography and film. The documentary The Visual Language of Herbert Matter by director Reto Caduff profiles his extraordinary life and seminal work. With the help of historical footage, photographs, never-before-seen film excerpts (some shot by Matter himself) and a broad overview of his extensive body of work, the documentary brings the picture of an overlooked creative genius back into focus. Including interviews with Robert Frank, Massimo Vignelli, Steven Heller and many others, the film tells the story of a remarkable career and its influential impact on the evolving language of design during the short 20th century both in the USA and Europe.

Written and Directed by: Reto Caduff
Duration: 78 minutes
Click for a Trailer

Wednesday, August 17, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
American Photography: A Century of Images
Episode 3: Photography Transformed (1960-1999)

American Photography: A Century of Images is the story of the pictures we have taken and where they have taken us. Dramatic and intimate stories trace photography's role as a recorder of public events, family historian, vehicle for artistic expression, and tool for influencing public opinion. Whether it be the evocative art photography of an Edward Weston, a first fragile image of the Earth taken from space, glamorous photographs of the latest fashions, a Dorothea Lange look at a bread line during the Great Depression, or a powerful war image by Robert Capa, the program captures the images of a century of change in this country and the role the camera has played both in creating and documenting it.

Episode 3: "Photography Transformed, 1960-1999"
The power of the photographic image is undiminished in the latter part of the 20th century, even though it faces new challenges from television and elsewhere. The series looks at surveillance photography and the Cuban Missile crisis, searing images from the Vietnam War, Civil Rights violence, image-driven celebrity, the growth of photography as an art form, carefully controlled Presidential "image politics," and the challenge to photographic truth when computers have the ability to alter photography without detection.

One thing is clear: despite new technologies, still images — whether captured on film or as electrons — will endure. There will be other flag raisings over other Iwo Jimas, other footprints on distant planets. We may think we have seen it all, but we cannot even imagine the images yet to come.

Click for a trailer.

Film Duration: 60 minutes
Cost:
FREE
Executive Producer:
John Schott
Produced and Directed by: Muffie Ellen, Meyer Hovde
Writer: Ronald Blumer
Narrated by: Harris Yulin

Wednesday, July 20, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
American Photography: A Century of Images
Episode 2: The Photographic Age (1935-1959)

American Photography: A Century of Images is the story of the pictures we have taken and where they have taken us. Dramatic and intimate stories trace photography's role as a recorder of public events, family historian, vehicle for artistic expression, and tool for influencing public opinion. Whether it be the evocative art photography of an Edward Weston, a first fragile image of the Earth taken from space, glamorous photographs of the latest fashions, a Dorothea Lange look at a bread line during the Great Depression, or a powerful war image by Robert Capa, the program captures the images of a century of change in this country and the role the camera has played both in creating and documenting it.

Episode 2: "The Photographic Age, 1935-1959"
In the 1930s, an explosion of mass media devoted to distributing photographs brought images to all Americans. Magazines like Life and Look were dedicated to photographs. An Associated Press "wirephoto" could be sent anywhere instantaneously, and suddenly millions of people were seeing the same pictures at the same time. Documentary photographers brought the Depression into the living rooms of America, and it seemed as if all of journalism had but one objective: to present the "truth" of far-away events in the form of a photographic image. Americans experienced World War II through the visual immediacy of the camera, while the consumer frenzy of the 1950s was driven by our desire to possess the images of abundance made vivid through photography.

Click for a trailer.

Film Duration: 60 minutes
Cost:
FREE
Executive Producer:
John Schott
Produced and Directed by: Muffie Ellen, Meyer Hovde
Writer: Ronald Blumer
Narrated by: Harris Yulin

Wednesday, June 15, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
American Photography: A Century of Images
Episode 1: The Developing Image (1900-1934)

American Photography: A Century of Images is the story of the pictures we have taken and where they have taken us. Dramatic and intimate stories trace photography's role as a recorder of public events, family historian, vehicle for artistic expression, and tool for influencing public opinion. Whether it be the evocative art photography of an Edward Weston, a first fragile image of the Earth taken from space, glamorous photographs of the latest fashions, a Dorothea Lange look at a bread line during the Great Depression, or a powerful war image by Robert Capa, the program captures the images of a century of change in this country and the role the camera has played both in creating and documenting it.

Episode 1: "The Developing Image, 1900-1934"
Although photography was invented in the first half of the 19th century, the beginning of the 20th century marked extraordinary changes. For the first time in history, inexpensive hand-held cameras gave ordinary people the opportunity to create their own visual images. Suddenly pictures were everywhere: on passports, in the developing picture press, in science. World War I photographs convinced many reluctant Americans that they had a stake in this distant war. Advertisers embraced photography because of its ability to create a fantasy that seemed to be a plausible reality. By the end of the 1920s, photographs — little flat pictures that came to stand uniquely for the truth — had made their way into virtually every corner of contemporary life.

Click for a trailer.

Film Duration: 60 minutes
Cost:
FREE
Executive Producer:
John Schott
Produced and Directed by: Muffie Ellen, Meyer Hovde
Writer: Ronald Blumer
Narrated by: Harris Yulin

Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
Vietnam's Unseen War: Pictures from the Other Side
Content

VIETNAM'S UNSEEN WAR: Pictures from the Other Side (National Geographic)

National Geographic journeys deep behind battle lines to experience a different side of the Vietnam War - the side seen only through the lenses of North Vietnamese photographers. Renowned British photojournalist Tim Page travels back to the land where he nearly lost his life to meet with North Vietnamese war photographers, revealing remarkable, never-before-seen photos and personal stories long hidden by time and tragedy.  

Duration: 60 minutes. Discussion will follow.
Directors: Nicolas Noxon, Robert Guenette, Bert Haanstra, Irwin Rosten, Nicholas Clapp
Cost: FREE

Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
Alfred Stieglitz: The Eloquent Eye
Content 24

Alfred Stieglitz: The Eloquent Eye" (from the series American Masters)

Stieglitz, who is revered as one of the most innovative photographers of the 20th century, played a primary role in fostering new talent. Through his three galleries in New York City, he mentored emerging artists such as Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, Ansel Adams, Eliot Porter and Georgia O'Keeffe; and introduced avant-garde Europeans such as Henri Matisse, Paul Cezanne, Auguste Rodin and Pablo Picasso. American Masters examines the achievements and legacy of this influential artist with Alfred Stieglitz - The Eloquent Eye. This revealing look at "The Father of Modern Photography" features a rare interview with Georgia O'Keeffe, Stieglitz's wife and muse, as well as archival footage of other artistic giants he inspired, including Edward Steichen and John Marin. Additionally, the film presents countless images from the Stieglitz archives, ranging from early European peasant life to later views of New York's urban landscape.   

Duration: 88 minutes – discussion will follow
Directed by: Perry Miller Adato

For a trailer Click HERE

Wednesday, March 16, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
CHEVOLUTION

CHEVOLUTION
The Man, The Myth, The Merchandise.


The Story of the World's Most Reproduced Photograph.
In 1960, Cuban photographer Alberto Korda Díaz snapped a photo of Ernesto Che Guevara. Eight years later, the image exploded throughout Europe and Latin America, where it became a symbol of protest and dissent. Today, the photograph remains one of the most dominant icons of the twentieth century. CHEVOLUTION is a film about a single photograph, and how this portrait, with its enigmatic gaze, became a symbol of countless visions for change.

Directed by Trisha Ziff, Luis Lopez
Duration: 89 minutes.

Click for a trailer.

Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
Pedro Guerrero: A Photographer's Journey

Discover the remarkable life and work of Pedro E. Guerrero (September 5, 1917-September 13, 2012), a Mexican American, born and raised in segregated Mesa, Arizona, who had an extraordinary international photography career. Using an exclusive interview with Guerrero along with his stunning images, the program explores his collaborations with three of the most iconic American artists of the 20th century: architect Frank Lloyd Wright and sculptors Alexander Calder and Louise Nevelson. Using his outsider's eye to produce insightful portraits of important modernist architecture, Guerrero became one of the most sought-after photographers of the Mad Men era, yet his poignant story is largely unknown.

Film directed by: Raymond Telles and Yvan Iturriaga
Film duration: 60 minutes. A discussion will follow.
FREE
Click to see a trailer

Wednesday, January 20, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
W. Eugene Smith: Photography Made Difficult

The war in the South Pacific, a country doctor in Colorado, victims of industrial pollution in a Japanese village - all of these were captured in unforgettable photographs by the legendary W. Eugene Smith. No matter where, what, or whom he was shooting, Smith drove himself relentlessly to create evocative portraits that revealed the essence of his subjects in a way that touched the emotion and conscience of viewers. The life and work of this brilliant and complicated man, whose passion for social justice matched his desire to create photographs that were works of art, are explored in this film.

Film directed by: Gene Lasko
Film duration: 87 minutes. A discussion will follow.
FREE
Click to see a trailer

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